CLIP & EACLIPSE Projects (2003 – 2010)

EACLIPSE is a cross-university project examining human and biological systems under climate change. The project focuses on climate changes in East Africa and how those changes affect people, livestock, farming, and savanna ecosystems.

Welcome to the Dynamic Interactions among People, Livestock, and Savanna Ecosystems under Climate Change project. The overall objective of this project is to examine the dynamics between coupled human-biophysical systems in savannas under climate change. Climate change is affecting savanna ecosystems which directly impact livestock and crop production, and peoples’ livelihoods.

EACLIPSE Profile

Research

The study area encompasses the savanna areas of Kenya and Tanzania. Researchers are using multiple methods and information sources in this project to identify the interactions in the coupled human-biophysical system. Our interdisciplinary team has expertise in spatial and temporal analysis, long-term field research on the impact of climate and other environmental changes on society in East Africa, and the use of existing datasets and models including a regional climate model calibrated for the region.

Team

The team is composed of climatologists, experts in land use/cover change, remote sensing, meteorology, geographic information systems, and ecology.

Institutions

Our collaborating institutions include Michigan State University, the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi, Kenya, Ohio University, Virginia Tech University, The University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, and the National Science Foundation.

Funding

Funding for the project: Dynamic Interactions among People, Livestock, and Savanna Ecosystems under Climate Change,Award No. BCS/CNH 0709671, is from the National Science Foundation Biocomplexity of Coupled Human and Natural Systems Program.

Past Projects

This project is a follow up to An Integrated Analysis of Regional Land-Climate Interactions, BE/CNH Award No. 0308420, from the National Science Foundation Biocomplexity of Coupled Human and Natural Systems Program and the Michigan State University Foundation, and can be accessed at http://www.clip.msu.edu/

CLIP Research Domain